Supporting Teachers

We give science teachers the tools and skills to help students overcome misconceptions and misinformation about climate change, evolution, and the nature of science.

National surveys show that 40% to 60% of U.S. public school science teachers hedge, equivocate, or send a mixed message when they teach evolution or climate change. NCSE aims to help all of them improve their teaching practices.

Read our surveys

NCSE's Teacher Partners

Click on the icons to learn more.

Key:
Teacher Ambassadors
Curriculum Study Field Testers

Lafayette, New York

David Amidon

Read More

Staten Island, New York

Felicia Giunta

Read More

Bronx, New York

Deborah Reich

Read More

Osage City, Kansas

Brock Baxter

Read More

Troy, Michigan

Rebecca Brewer

Read More

Dearborn, Michigan

Steven "Andy" Epton

Read More

Darcie Ruby

Read More

Clinton Township, Michigan

Chandler Missig

Read More

Cincinnati, Ohio

Jennifer Broo

Read More

Asheville, North Carolina

Jason Carter

Read More

Indianapolis, Indiana

Jeremy Cook

Read More

New Castle, Pennsylvania

Al Dorsch

Read More

Wilmerding, Pennsylvania

Leslie Robbins

Read More

Baltimore, Maryland

LaStelshia Speaks

Read More

Katherine Hinkley-Jenkins

Read More

Downers Grove, Illinois

Jeff Grant

Read More

Newark, Illinois

Thomas Foss

Read More

Minooka, Illinois

Amy Kelly

Read More

Anaheim, California

Tom Freeman

Read More

Columbia, Missouri

Ericca Thornhill

Read More

Odessa, Texas

Allystair Jones

Read More

Dallas, Texas

John Mead

Read More

Round Rock, Texas

Jennifer Kaszuba

Read More

Bowling Green, Kentucky

Mary Ellen Markham

Read More

Amanda Staggs

Read More

Jessica Newport

Read More

Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Alex Swavely

Read More

Piedmont, Oklahoma

Melissa Lau

Read More

Norman, Oklahoma

Amelia Cook

Read More

Midwest City, Oklahoma

Shelena Thomas

Read More

Maurice, Louisiana

Blake Touchet

Read More

Emmett, Idaho

Robin Wilson

Read More

Santa Maria, California

Laura Branch

Read More

Omaha, Nebraska

Dawn Fuelberth

Read More

Sarasota, Florida

Angelee Gens

Read More

West Point, Mississippi

Shatavia Harris

Read More

Phoenix, Arizona

Melissa Mara

Read More

Laurinburg, North Carolina

Xaviera McCrae

Read More

Thornton, Colorado

Jason Stevens

Read More

Pittsburg, New Hampshire

April Wallace

Read More

Chattanooga, Tennessee

Matthew Allen

Read More

Michael Lowry

Read More

Karah Nazor

Read More

Rochester, Minnesota

Laura Unterholnzer

Read More

Janelle Milliken

Read More

Cheryl Moertel

Read More
NCSE Teacher Ambassador Blake Touchet with one of his students

How It Works

At the heart of our model are our Teacher Ambassadors and the lessons on the nature of science, evolution, and climate change they helped develop. We are currently field-testing those lessons in 32 middle and high school classrooms around the country to ensure that they help students resolve misconceptions — and inoculate them against future encounters with misconceptions.

Learn More About Our Curriculum Study

Impact

Our goal is to reach those teachers who don't have the content expertise or confidence required to teach climate change, evolution, and the nature of science. Our surveys tell us that there is high demand for professional development on these topics. We know that if we can help these teachers, we'll have a great impact on young people all across the country.

Find out more about our impact

Meet the Ambassadors

Since the inception of our Teacher Ambassador initiative, we have counted 47 teachers from across the country among its ranks and many are still guiding our work today. They are master teachers who are adept at navigating the challenges of teaching climate change and evolution in regions where those topics are socially controversial.

Meet our Ambassadors

For Teachers

Explore our

Teaching Resources

Our Teacher Ambassadors have developed freely available, adaptable units on climate change, evolution, and the nature of science. Check out these lessons, as well as other valuable teaching resources.

What I do when students have opposition to climate change is try not to impose my viewpoints. Instead, I have several simulations that we run in class and they come to their own conclusions.Rebecca Brewer
Michigan

Sign up for

NCSEteach

Each month, you'll get in your inbox links to vetted classroom-ready teaching resources, as well as the latest developments at NCSE from Director of Teacher Support Lin Andrews. It's easy to sign up and stay informed!

I feel both excited and humbled that I now get the chance to share my knowledge, experiences, and passion for teaching evolution with my fellow science teachers. Blake Touchet
Louisiana

Meet Our Teacher Ambassadors

These talented educators are science content experts who utilize the best - and innovative - teaching practices. They also understand how to communicate effectively with students, families, and administrators about the teaching of climate change and evolution in a non-confrontational manner. Each Teacher Ambassador is experienced in incorporating understanding of the nature of science, a critical element of successful evolution and climate change education. 

Learn more about our amazing group

National Center for Science Education (NCSE) is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization, EIN 11-2656357. NCSE is supported by individuals, foundations, and scientific societies. Review our annual audited financial statements and IRS 990 forms at GuideStar.

© Copyright 2020 National Center for Science Education. Privacy Policy and Disclaimer | Disclosures Required by State Law