Supporting Teachers

We give science teachers the tools and skills they need to help their students overcome misconceptions and misinformation about climate change and evolution.

National surveys show that 40% to 60% of U.S. public school science teachers hedge, equivocate, or send a mixed message when they teach evolution or climate change. NCSE aims to help all of them improve their teaching practices.

Read our surveys

Teacher Ambassadors across the country

Hover over the icons to learn more.

Amidon

Lafayette, New York

David Amidon

Read More

Baxter

Osage City, Kansas

Brock Baxter

Read More

Bougeous

Salt Lake City, Utah

Bonnie Bourgeous

Read More

Brewer

Troy, Michigan

Rebecca Brewer

Read More

Broo

Cincinnati, Ohio

Jennifer Broo

Read More

Carbutt

Monte Vista, Colorado

Lyle Carbutt

Read More

Carter

Asheville, North Carolina

Jason Carter

Read More

Citron

New York, New York

Jerrry Citron

Read More

Clark

East Providence, Rhode Island

Jen Clark

Read More

Cook

Indianapolis, Indiana

Jeremy Cook

Read More

Corley

Galveston, Texas

Nina Corley

Read More

Cruz

Gallup, New Mexico

Arnel Dela Cruz

Read More

Dorsch

New Castle, Pennsylvania

Al Dorsch

Read More

Duncan

Russellville, Arkansas

Chance Duncan

Read More

Epton

Gretna, Virginia

Steven Epton

Read More

Evans

Worton, Maryland

Joe Evans

Read More

Baltimore, Maryland

LaStelshia Speaks

Read More

Foss

Newark, Illinois

Thomas Foss

Read More

Freeman

Anaheim, California

Tom Freeman

Read More

Goff

Lexington, Kentucky

Patrick Goff

Read More

Grant

Downers Grove, Illinois

Jeff Grant

Read More

Groff

Santa Ana, California

Susan Groff

Read More

Haste

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Turtle Haste

Read More

Hibdon

Columbia, Missouri

Karen Hibdon

Read More

Ericca Thornhill

Read More

Jones

Odessa, Texas

Allystair Jones

Read More

Kay

La Mirada, California

Padmini Kishore

Read More

Landry

Nokesville, Virgina

Melinda Landry

Read More

Lau

Piedmont, Oklahoma

Melissa Lau

Read More

Lozada

Naranjito, Puerto Rico

Glenda Lozada

Read More

Mead

Dallas, Texas

John Mead

Read More

Mohlman

Austin, Texas

Dean Mohlman

Read More

Morgan

Bowling Green, Kentucky

Susan Morgan

Read More

Morrow

Lincoln, Nebraska

Mary Morrow

Read More

Murnan

Woodstock, Georgia

John Murnan

Read More

Neeley

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Milan Neeley

Read More

Ott

Dalton, Georgia

Sarah Ott

Read More

Parfitt

Cheyenne, Wyoming

Kim Parfitt

Read More

Pipes

Wilkesboro, North Carolina

Kelly Pipes

Read More

Richard

Olathe, Kansas

Meg Richard

Read More

Richardson-McVicker

Stillwater, Oklahoma

Traci Richardson-McVicker

Read More

Sleeper

Vero Beach, Florida

Melissa Sleeper

Read More

Stutzman

Boise, Idaho

Erin Stutzman

Read More

Swihart

Beaverton, Oregon

Coleen Swihart

Read More

Touchet

Maurice, Louisiana

Blake Touchet

Read More

White

Seneca, South Carolina

Chris White

Read More

Wood

Duluth, Minnesota

Alison Wood

Read More
NCSE Teacher Ambassador Blake Touchet with one of his students

How It Works

At the heart of our model are our Teacher Ambassadors. They lead professional learning for peers who are otherwise unprepared or lacking confidence to teach climate change and evolution, using vetted, engaging, ambassador-created units with a distinct focus on inoculating students against common misconceptions. 

Learn more about our unique approach

Impact

Our goal is to reach those teachers who don't have easy access or haven't been exposed to high-quality lessons and professional development when it comes to climate change and evolution. We know that if we can help those teachers, we'll have a greater impact on young people all across the country.

Find out more about our impact

Meet the Ambassadors

We currently have 47 Teacher Ambassadors in 29 states and Puerto Rico and their numbers–and locations–continue to grow! They are master teachers who are adept at navigating the challenges of teaching climate change and evolution in regions where those topics are socially controversial.

Meet our Ambassadors

For Teachers

Explore our

Teaching Resources

Our Teacher Ambassadors have developed freely available, adaptable units on climate change, evolution, and the nature of science. Check out these lessons, as well as other valuable teaching resources.

What I do when students have opposition to climate change is try not to impose my viewpoints. Instead, I have several simulations that we run in class and they come to their own conclusions.Rebecca Brewer
Michigan

Sign up for

NCSEteach

Each month, you’ll get in your inbox links to vetted classroom-ready teaching resources, as well as the latest developments at NCSE from Director of Teacher Support Brad Hoge. It’s easy to sign up and stay informed!

I feel both excited and humbled that I now get the chance to share my knowledge, experiences, and passion for teaching evolution with my fellow science teachers. Blake Touchet
Louisiana

Meet Our Teacher Ambassadors

These talented educators are science content experts who utilize the best - and innovative - teaching practices. They also understand how to communicate effectively with students, families, and administrators about the teaching of climate change and evolution in a non-confrontational manner. Each Teacher Ambassador is experienced in incorporating understanding of the nature of science, a critical element of successful evolution and climate change education. 

Learn more about our amazing group

X
We can't afford to lose any time when it comes to the future of science education.

National Center for Science Education (NCSE) is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization, EIN 11-2656357. NCSE is supported by individuals, foundations, and scientific societies. Review our annual audited financial statements and IRS 990 forms at GuideStar.

© Copyright 2019 National Center for Science Education. Privacy Policy and Disclaimer | Disclosures Required by State Law