Millions of students don't get an accurate science education

How do we know?

The National Center for Science Education believes they deserve better.

The Root of the Problem

Science teachers recognize that evolution and climate change are widely misunderstood or rejected in many places.

Teaching these topics without specific training is challenging. Many teachers avoid these well-established yet culturally controversial areas of science to avoid conflict.

60% of high school biology teachers teach evolution inaccurately or inadequately.

Read the Study

40% of middle and high school teachers teach climate change inaccurately.

Read the Study

How We Help

The National Center for Science Education:

Our Impact

Supporting Teachers

47
Teacher Ambassadors across 29 states and Puerto Rico

Breaking Down Barriers

10
Graduate Student Outreach Fellows in 7 states

Catalyzing Action

12
States with anti-science education legislative activity in 2019

More from NCSE

October 9, 2019
"That climate change is happening and that humanity is at least partly responsible is a view held by the majority across the world," according to YouGov's report of a new international poll of people in twenty-eight countries and regions. "The climate is changing and human activity is mainly…
October 4, 2019
Two college students approach a nurse in a hospital in Taiwan, unsure of what to do. She deftly reads their hesitation, then puts them to work rolling bandages and dispensing medication. Hard at work, they start asking questions about the flu epidemic currently tearing through the hospital. After…
October 1, 2019
Late last year, when we began to get serious about updating our website, the design team we were working with asked us to tell them what we liked in a website. So we started looking at the websites of other non-profit organizations with missions similar to NCSE—environmental and educational groups…
October 1, 2019
NCSE is pleased to announce that the latest issue of Reports of the National Center for Science Education — volume 39, number 4 — is now available online.  Featured are Kate Carter’s report on NCSE's work equipping Smithsonian volunteers to tackle difficult conversations, Paul Oh's…
September 27, 2019
NCSE's executive director Ann Reid contributed "Dry Facts, Debate, Despair: How Not to Teach Climate Change" to Education Week (September 23, 2019). "Dry facts, debate, doom and gloom—teachers striving to teach climate change effectively despite the obstacles to doing so can be forgiven…

National Center for Science Education (NCSE) is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization, EIN 11-2656357. NCSE is supported by individuals, foundations, and scientific societies. Review our annual audited financial statements and IRS 990 forms at GuideStar.

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